Kids Need Healthy Food!



Remember what your mom said:

“Eat your vegetables.”

Of course, as a father of two vegan babies, we never have to say this because … well, that’s pretty much all they eat. Vegetables, fruit, rice, brown rice pasta, and so many¬†more plant-based foods are the entirety of their every meal and I wouldn’t want it any¬†other way.

Not sure how many parents of a two-year-old boy can say their kid hangs out in the refrigerator looking for broccoli. Or grapes. Or hummus. Or guacamole. Ours does and the 11-month-old baby is right behind him.

Raising kids vegan gives them an enormous head-start on a healthy future and it also is a compassionate reminder that animals are not food.

Animals are not food.

There are a growing number of organizations committed to ensuring that kids have access to plant-based meals (you should check out what PlantPure Nation is up to with their PlantPure Pods). Another organization near (geographically) and dear (I am friends with the Executive Director) to me is the New York Coalition for Healthy School Food.

I met Amie Hamlin years ago at the whole-foods, plant-based Friday Dinner held in nearby Brooktondale, New York. She is an incredibly committed and passionate woman who is helping to bring plant-based foods to all¬†public schools in New York (if you’ve heard about this on the news recently, Amie was behind it). We all want a healthy future for our children and the Coalition is making this happen … one school at a time.

The Coalition’s vegan recipes have been distributed to 25,000 schools nationwide and their Wellness Wakeup Call program is heard by tens of thousands of students around the country every day! And today (8/28/15) is a very important day to the organization.

Giving is Gorges.

The Coalition for Healthy School Food is teaching healthy plant-based cooking and nutrition classes in Ithaca and New York City and today is Giving is Gorges day in Ithaca. In the Ithaca classes, students cook vegan entrees that will be on their school menu for lunch that week. Kids, teachers, and parents love the program. Some teachers and parents are surprised to see the kids eating the food they make.

And the kids agree that the international recipes from different cultures are delicious. Today, your donation can help the Coalition for Healthy School Food raise additional funds. The group with the most donations (greatest number of donations) will get an additional $500! Please help them get this! Click here to find out why they had to tell kids to stop eating vegetables, and to donate.

Please share and Go Vegan.


Animal Lyrics Project: A Vegan Exhibition (Working Title)


vegan poster art

I have always been a fan of great poster art and typography. The way in which type is used to effectively, and hopefully beautifully, communicate a message is the very foundation of design excellence. We often remind our clients that content comes first and that design follows.

“Content precedes design. Design in the absence of content is not design, it‚Äôs decoration.”

~ Jeffrey Zeldman

This was the inspiration for an online art exhibition we are curating at ThankTank Creative.

The “Animal Lyrics Project: A Vegan Exhibition (Working Title)”¬†is a collection of assorted posters dedicated to three of our favorite things: animals, veganism, and music.

Inspired by lyrics from songs inspired by animals, written by some of the greatest song writers of our time, we are provided  exemplary content to drive our designs.

Not wanting to have all the fun ourselves (and wanting to make sure we didn’t end up with 10 orange posters), we invited nine¬†other vegan designers to come on board to show of their design chops and to help this exhibit be as diverse as the song titles themselves. The list of designers, so far:

The “Animal Lyrics Project: A Vegan Exhibition (Working Title)” will officially go live on/around July 15th and be featured on numerous vegan blogs, Facebook pages, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, and through numerous respected media channels. Our hope is that these graphics will be shared and re-shared, promoting great design as well as the message of veganism.

Do you have an animal lyric you’d love to see turned into poster art? Comment below and, as always …

Go vegan.


Edible Finger Lakes’ Not So Palatable Cover



As you read this, keep one thing in mind: I’m an ethical vegan. Yes, my diet is vegan (no meat, dairy, eggs, or honey) but being an ethical vegan goes a few steps further. Not only have I replaced all my animal-sourced clothing and personal care products with cruelty-free versions, but I have “made the connection.” I not only recognize where meat comes from but I also have deep, emotional feelings attached to the animals that are purposefully (and needlessly) bred and raised to be raped, tortured, and killed for food.

So, as you read this blog post, please keep this in mind.

I was at the grocery store this week when something caught my eye. In fact, I had this feeling I was being watched. There on the shelf, among other travel and food magazines, was the new issue of Edible Finger Lakes, the regional culinary and travel publication for the area where I live in New York State. Staring at me, with an undeniable sadness in its eyes was a sweet piglet. Captured at a moment in time that now acts as a memorial to its life. This young piglet (former front cover magazine model) is now, surely, dead.

For no good reason. None.

To make matters worse, this piglet stood under the magazine’s masthead: “Edible Finger Lakes.” As if its only food and not a sentient being. As if it’s not an animal with a mother and a family and friends and a spirit attached to a will to live.

And this young piglet, with¬†the unforgettable look in its eyes, stood alongside the words “Good Meat,” presumably a lead-in to an article about how wonderfully these animals are raised, and fed, and treated so that the consumer (animal eaters) are guaranteed the highest quality pork anywhere. And of course, like all good meat, I’m sure this piglet was humanely killed. Humanely killed good meat.

Good meat?

Is that all it is? We won’t know its name? Or where it lived? Or anything else about its short life. Just the fact that it’s existence is considered good meat?


What struck me the most, though, as I was leaving the store was that this innocent and trusting beast was most likely killed by the time I saw the magazine in the rack. Throat slit, skinned, bled, butchered, packaged and sold. Its life never mattered to anyone who crossed its path. Or looked it in the eyes. Or, took its photograph and decided to put it on the cover of a magazine.

When did humankind become so callous and uncaring and cold?

Is this really what we’ve become?

When did an intelligent and social animal, like a pig, become the “mascot” for bacon? Pigs aren’t made of bacon.

Hipsters, in your flannel shirts and thick-glasses and shaggy beards, please find another food to worship. Please. And Edible Finger Lakes, please try to be more compassionate in the future when choosing a front cover image.

Go vegan.


FOR SALE: Horse Urine $1,000,000,000/yr Potential Income. Premarin Cures Crankiness!


Horse Toture

Every so often I find out about something that is so outrageous and disgusting, I have to stop everything I’m doing to blog about it. The use of beaver anal sac excretions in my morning cereal was one of these things and the added carrageenan in my almond milk was another, but these dull by comparison to what I found out about the drug Premarin.

I get it, menopause is probably uncomfortable for women and makes them cranky and unable to sleep at night but any amount of discomfort cannot compare to the practice of impregnating horses, limiting their water intake and movement, collecting their urine for use in the drug, and then killing their offspring. Or, in some cases, the “lucky” ones get to live so they can lead the same enslaved life as their mother.

If you are currently taking Premarin, please stop reading this blog post. You are not welcome here.

Any form of animal abuse is bad and I am oftentimes criticized for singling out what abuse I think is “worse” than other abuse (the fact that it is legal to eat your own cat or dog in 43 U.S. states disgusts me but, technically, it is no worse than the millions and millions of animals mistreated and killed for food around the world). What gets me about Permarin, is that there are options that do not involve animal secretions or animal testing and, in fact, there are options that involve changing your diet.

In fact, nearly all symptoms of menopause can be controlled by going vegan. A high intake of phytoestrogens is thought to explain why hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms rarely occur in populations consuming a predominantly plant-based diet. Increased intake of phytoestrogens by consuming more: soy milk, linseed, tofu, tempeh and miso, pumpkins seeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, celery, rhubarb and green beans will help with menopause.

I know, I know … going vegan is drastic whereas having someone else rape and enslave a beautiful mare to collect her urine while she is pregnant and, subsequently, killing her useless offspring isn’t.

I’ve said it once before and I will say it again: Pfuck Pfizer.

Go vegan.


More Evidence that Animals Are Not Food



We have a little vegan boy smashing his way around our apartment. At 17-months, he can pretty much pick up any piece of furniture and toss it across the room. He runs into things full-speed and eats an entire tray of food by the fistful. He is 100% vegan.

We are expecting another vegan baby at the end of next month so, hopefully, that will give Little Hulk enough of a distraction that he’ll settle down. Meanwhile, the only thing he sits still for (besides food), is a good book.

Recently, friends of ours (one of which has a vegan blog here), gave us a copy of Lois Ehltert’s wonderful board book, “Eating the Alphabet.” Lois Ehlert’s Caldecott-winning children’s books are alive with vibrant colors and her collages are just beautiful. Hailing from Wisconsin, so many of her books are a natural part of every infant’s library that they traditionally¬†share a shelf with Eric Carle’s “Very Hungry Caterpillar.” The big, noticeable difference between Carle’s gastronomic tome and Lois’ “Eating the Alphabet” is that one book is vegan and the other … well, sorry caterpillar fans, is not.

As vegan parents, we are always prepared to replace un-vegan passages with vegan phrases: “This Little Piggy went to market … this Little Piggy stayed home … this Little Piggy had kale salad …” You get the idea.

The interesting thing about “Eating the Alphabet” that I think is worth pointing out is that it doesn’t have to be edited. Lois Ehlert takes us from A to Z without once stopping at “C’ is for chicken, or “P” is for pork, or “W” for water buffalo. And to be even more specific, the author didn’t use cheese or eggs (which also shouldn’t be consumed).

To some, this might be overlooked but to me there is a very powerful message in this book that resonates with me every time I read it: animals are not food.

They aren’t.

There is no valid reason or argument to eat animals and anyone who continues to do so, is not clearly not making the connection. Animals are our friends and we don’t eat our friends. At least I don’t.

Go vegan.


Meat’s Better Dead




If you have to eat meat and, face it, it seems like some of us need meat to survive, you should always check for the “100% Dead Animal” seal on every package. Your family deserves this and, this way, you’ll be sure that you “don’t let that meal get away.”

Forget “grass-fed, or “free-range” or even “humanely-killed,” what’s most important when planning your dinner is making sure you are cooking 100% dead animal. Don’t settle for anything less …

Go vegan.


Does “Humane Meat” Bring People Closer to Veganism?



Debunking the claim that “humane meat” is a positive step toward veganism, my good friend and fellow vegan, Sherry F. Colb author of Mind if I Order the Cheeseburger, posted this essay on Dorf On Law¬†today and encouraged me to share it. I encourage you to share it as well.

The Fallacy of the Claim That “Research” Shows That “Humane Meat” Brings People Closer to Veganism by Sherry F. Colb

Over the last few months, I have repeatedly heard a peculiar claim articulated by a variety of vegan advocates on different vegan outlets. The claim is this: Even though it might seem that people consuming so-called “humane” animal products poses an obstacle to the movement for veganism, “research” shows that the opposite is true. “Research” shows that when people decide to purchase “humane” animal products, this choice increases the odds that those same people will eventually decide to become vegan. When I first heard this claim, I was intrigued. Could it be that animal farmers encouraging people to purchase their “local, sustainable, and [allegedly] humane” animal products were actually helping the vegan cause?

The answer is that the research on which people have based this conclusion gives us no reason to imagine that “humane” animal products bring people closer to veganism. My own conclusion, based on a combination of logic, experience, and my own anecdotal observations, leads me to believe that in fact, the opposite is true, that encouraging people to consume so-called “humane” animal products poses a major obstacle to the continuing spread of veganism. But quite apart from what I think, the research that supposedly supports the utility of encouraging the consumption of “humane” animal products in moving people closer to veganism does no such thing.

How can I say this? Well, let us consider what the research actually shows and why the conclusions people have drawn from that research do not at all follow from it. Here’s the supposedly revolutionary finding: It turns out that people who purchase animal products labeled “humane” (or “compassionate” or some other equally misleading adjective) may be more likely eventually to become vegetarian or vegan than are people who do not purchase these products. That is, there is a correlation between people buying animal-derived products labeled “humane” at point 1 in time, and people reducing or ending their consumption of animal-derived products at point 2 in time.

As everyone knows, a correlation does not necessarily indicate causation. But the problem with drawing the inference that vegan advocates have been drawing from the above finding goes well beyond the “post hoc ergo propter hoc” fallacy. Enter “selection bias.” Selection bias is the reality that people will often self-select to engage in an activity at time 1 and whatever motivated that self-selection can also fully account for the same people’s choice to engage in another activity at time 2.

Consider the following observational study. I observe that one group of people spends a lot more money at the grocery store on luxury items such as truffle oil and saffron than other people do. I decide to keep an eye on these people, because I want to know what the impact of all of this supermarket-spending might be. Eight months later, I observe that this same group of people is embarking on much more exotic and expensive vacations in places much farther away from home than other people who did not spend as much money at the supermarket as this group did. I conclude from these observations that buying expensive food at the supermarket helps enable people to be able to go on exotic and expensive vacations eight months later. Wanting to go on such a vacation myself, I immediately begin to spend a lot more money on groceries.

This hypothetical example helps illustrate selection bias. The act of spending a lot of money at the supermarket did not help to make an expensive vacation possible. If anything, this act would appear to hinder one’s ability to take an expensive vacation, all things being equal, by depleting one’s bank account. However, the people who choose to spend a lot of money at the supermarket are often doing so because they have a lot of money. Their having a lot of money has caused them to feel free to spend a lot on groceries. Then, eight months later, because they started with a lot of money, more than other people have, they also had enough money to pay for an expensive vacation that the rest of the population cannot afford. If I were to take my observations as evidence that spending a lot on groceries enables one to take an expensive vacation, however, then I would probably end up undermining my own goal, and I would be doing so because I ignored selection bias.


A very similar dynamic seems likely to be in play when we observe that the people who purchase “humane” animal products at Time 1 are more likely than people generally to be purchasing only vegan products at Time 2. Buying supposedly “humane” animal flesh and secretions is something that many people do when they are driven to try to act more mercifully and ethically toward their fellow sentient beings. Years ago, before I became vegan, I tried to buy containers of cows’ milk (or what would more accurately be called the “lacteal secretions produced by a mother for her baby calf”) that said “grass fed” and “organic” on them, because I thought (erroneously, as it turned out) that this meant that the cows from whom the milk was taken (a) did not encounter human violence and cruelty during their lives and/or (b) were allowed to live out their lives in peace, eating grass, never having to be slaughtered. Eventually, I learned that my beliefs were nonsense (nonsense amply cultivated by those who sell animal products), and I made the decision to become vegan. It is hardly the case, however, that consuming (mis)-labeled animal products helped move me closer to veganism; if anything, it slowed me down by falsely assuring me that I was already “doing right by the animals” by avoiding “factory-farmed” products.

If you think about it, it is not at all surprising that people who feel moved to act ethically and mercifully toward animals will make up a disproportionate share of the people buying supposedly “ethical” animal products and a disproportionate share of the people becoming vegan. A third variable — consciousness about one’s obligation to refrain from inflicting unnecessary suffering on other beings — can fully account¬†for people’s desire to do both things. Similarly, if you observe someone buying a vegan frozen pizza, such as Tofurky, at Time 1, you may be more likely than otherwise to observe that same person adopting a dog from a shelter (rather than purchasing a dog from a breeder) at Time 2. Yet no one would claim that eating a slice vegan pizza causes a person to adopt a dog from a shelter.

Ordinarily, it might seem harmless when people assume that performing act 1 causes a person to perform act 2, just because we observe that the same people who perform act 1 later perform act 2. But if the goal of citing this research about “humane” animal products is to alter the way that people conduct their advocacy, then it is anything but harmless. If someone tells me that he buys all of his flesh from a “humane” butcher and all of his lacteal secretions from a “humane” dairy farmer, this tells me that he is the sort of person who cares about animal suffering and wants to do what he can to reduce it. He has, however, been misled into thinking that what he is purchasing is the product of merciful treatment towards animals, when it in fact involves tremendous cruelty and harm to animals, and he is also (from a logical standpoint) less likely to become vegan than he was before, because he has managed to mollify his conscience by purchasing the “humane” product. Indeed, that is presumably why suppliers create the “humane” product in the first place — to keep animal consumers consuming animal products and to distract them from the actual humane alternative, vegan products. The purveyors of “humane” products could hardly be expected to label their products “humane” if they believed that such labeling would lead people closer to veganism.

I know that there are many people who are far more interested in the phenomenon of selection bias than I am and who have much more to say on the subject. I have nonetheless decided to write this post about selection bias, because I have felt an increasing amount of frustration upon hearing this claim about the counter-intuitive results of “research” that should be altering the way animal advocates engage with the public. The research may tell us that the people who consume humane animal products are, all things being equal, more likely to become vegan than the general population. But this plainly does not mean that consuming “humane” animal products moves people closer to veganism. And if you are hoping to take an expensive, exotic vacation, I would strongly recommend against spending large amounts of cash at the supermarket between now and your vacation time. You’re welcome.

Go vegan.

PAINTINGS:¬†“Human Evolution 1 and 2” by Al Jackson.


SeaWorld Plans Massive Rebranding Campaign: Welcome to “MeWorld”



[ORLANDO, FL] With record low attendance and revenue lagging, SeaWorld announced on Memorial Day 2014 a massive rebranding campaign for the company and a “strategic rethinking” of how the controversial parks are operated.

“The reaction to the documentary ‘Blackfish‘ and the negative media coverage we have experienced in Q1 has forced us to change entirely SeaWorld,” stated Robert Sanders, Director of Public Relations. “Starting June 1, 2014, all SeaWorld locations will be known as ‘MeWorld‘.”

The release went on to state that instead of the parks featuring orcas, dolphins, and other marine life, park visitors will now get to experience “life like a whale” by spending days at a time swimming in circles in undersized pools and being hand-fed fresh-caught seafood which is being provided by the new Red Lobster.

“It’s an incredible opportunity for park attendees,” Sanders commented. “They will finally feel what it is like being catered to in the lap of luxury. All they have to do for all-you-can-eat shrimp is occasionally wave to audience members, jump through hoops, and splash kids in the front row. Who wouldn’t want this deal?”

MeWorld Orlando tickets will be discounted throughout the entire month of June ($45) and MeWorld San Antonio and San Diego will extend special admission rates through July 4th. Visitors can also purchase a full season VIP ticket ($89) which allows them to have their belly rubbed daily as well as be masturbated by certified MeWorld trainers.

For more information, visit

Go vegan.



Piglets: It’s Where Food Comes From



A person I met recently through a professional network this week posted an album of his kids visiting a nearby pig farm. This is one of those “pasture-raised” farms where the pigs can lounge about happily and interact with visitors. The photos showed his daughter snuggling with some piglets and a family of pigs relaxing in the early summer sun. I wrote a blog post not too long ago that parodied this very notion, you can read it here. Come to find out, that blog posted wasn’t satire at all.

The caption that accompanied the photos read something like: “Took the kids to the The Piggery to ‘show them where food comes from.'”

Where food comes from?* Pigs aren’t food. They are animals. Sentient beings. Wait, am I missing something here? So, I visited the Piggery’s website and found this explanation of this pig paradise¬†located on a 70-acre farm in Trumansburg, just outside of Ithaca, NY:

Here at The Piggery, we’re a different kind of farm. We’re doing everything we can to create pork that is good for the people, good for the land and good for the pigs, with a focus on minimizing our carbon footprint. We raise heirloom breeds of pigs on pasture, supplemented with locally raised GMO-free small grains (barley, wheat, triticale, peas).

Good for the pigs? Now I know I am missing something here. You can actually bring your¬†kids to the farm to play with the piglets who will, most likely¬†the next day, be murdered for their meat? What part of this is “good for the pigs”?

The site then goes on to mention that they breed¬†“handsome Mulefoot & Glouchestshire Old Spot boars with Yorkshire, Durcoc, Hampshire and Tamworth ladies to make some darn cute piglets.” Darn cute piglets? What’s the point of how cute they are if they are going to¬†eventually¬†be slaughtered? Does cuteness¬†get you out of your death sentence?

Rest assured, these well-bred, cute piglets are being “humanely slaughtered.” According to the site, “We have witnessed the slaughtering procedure and are comfortable that the slaughterhouse does a good, humane job.” They should change their tagline to “We Put Laughter Back into Slaughter.”

See what I did there?

There is no such thing as “humanely slaughtered” anything. And educating your kids about their food source being animals they can play with, isn’t an education at all. All of this aside, if you’re looking for a fun field trip in the Finger Lakes and you want to show your kids “where food comes from,” I recommend¬†Indian Creek Farm or Cornell Orchards or Little Tree Orchards¬†in Newfield. I also recommend you …

Go vegan.

Banner_Resized* I should mention that the next day I mentioned this to one of my omnivore friends and she immediately agreed. Food comes from animals. This is such an incredibly foreign concept to me since I made the connection.


What Meat is Actually Good For: New Data Revealed



[New Cordell, OK] Earlier this week the National Meat and Fish Oversight Committee (NMFOC) in New Cordell, Oklahoma announced controlled findings on what “meat” is actually good for. While the study, which was partly funded by the Food and Drug Administration and Tyson Foods, was set out to explore the nutritional and dietary advantages of¬†consuming¬†meat, it instead revealed new, unexpected results.

In a simulated farm setting, milking cows, beef cattle, pigs, goats, ducks, and chickens were carefully observed during a two week timeframe to gain insight into their social and grazing habits, as well as their natural actions, when left to roam freely. This, combined with auxiliary¬†scientific data, led to a¬†new conclusion on “what meat is good for.”

“Our team at the NMFOC has solid evidence and will¬†report out our findings in an official dossier later this year,” announced Bradford Cummings, the Director of NMFOC at a recent press conference. “We have concluded, beyond any other known evidence or fact, that for the health and well-being of our subjects, meat is best left on the animal. Uneaten. The structure of the beasts, in relation to their flesh and skin, seems to benefit from not removing the meat from their skeletal bones. The meat, along with muscle and skin, seems to actually assist in keeping the animal in one piece. Which the animals seem to enjoy.”

This statistic goes against the commonly-held belief that meat is intended for human consumption, requiring the slaughter and butchering of each animal and the subsequent packaging and promotion of their flesh.

Cummings later went on to comment that not only do the animals thrive when their meat is left in tact, but they seem to become less afraid of humans and become more sociable and, as he continued, “… are actually quite adorable when you get to know them.”

Go vegan.

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The One-Day Vegan Challenge: Making it Easy on the Omnivores



My birthday is this Sunday. I’ve always loved my birthday, pretty much since the day I was born. My Mom always tells a story about me being a little boy growing up and being happy with anything. Didn’t have to be a toy. I just found happiness in anything and everything. I was always grateful. These days I am still that way and I’m feeling happier than ever. In fact, for my birthday this year I really only want one thing:

For you to be vegan for one day.

This Sunday, April 6th, in honor of that historic day in Queens, New York, I want you to go vegan. If you’re already vegan (which many of my followers are), please pass this challenge along to the omnivores in your life. One day. Sunday brunch through Sunday dinner.

This is very different than the popular Meatfree Monday (which I love, by the way and is a perfect follow up to this Vegan Sunday) because being vegan also means not consuming dairy (milk, cheese, yogurt, etc.) or eggs. Drink your coffee black or splash in delicious vanilla coconut creamer. Make rugged roasted potatoes with thick cut onions and rosemary. Make a tofu scramble or retrofit that scramble into a quiche. Eat fruit. Vegetables. Oatmeal with brown sugar. Or, finally check out that vegan restaurant you’ve been avoiding. Trust me, you won’t go hungry.

This also means for this one day set aside your wool socks and leather belt and dress like a vegan (which is jeans, t-shirt, and canvas shoes, if you’d like). From the moment you wake up on Sunday … be vegan.

Think about what you are eating, wearing, doing, saying, and thinking.

For one day.

If you’ll do this for me, for my birthday, I will be even happier than I already am. Let me know you’re up for the challenge, or you have convinced someone to try it by commenting here on my blog (or, comment on Monday to let me know how it went).

Go vegan (for one day).