Dangers of Soy: The Death Toll Rises

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[LAWTON, OK] In the ongoing debate on the negative health effects of soy as it relates to the lifespan of humans, another untimely death this week in Lawton, Oklahoma, directly links soybeans with the passing of a union worker, Shepard Pilgrim. “He was a hard worker for almost 25 years,” said a fellow employee at the Oklahoma Tofu Company (OTC) where Pilgrim was employed. “Sheppy will be missed.”

According to the report from the Lawton Police Deparment, Shepard Pilgrim was unloading crates of soybeans that had just been shipped from Iowa when the delivery truck’s parking brake system failed and rolled backward and pinned Pilgrim against the loading dock. “The slight decline made for a very slow and painful death for old Sheppy,” Sam Drimple, OTC District Manager stated in a phone interview. “For years the vegan community has been warned against the negative health risks of soy and I guess this proves the point. Soybeans can be deadly and can lead to a long, slow death,” he continued. “Poor Sheppy.”

Many proponents of the meat and dairy industry for years have been waging a powerful campaign against soy-based products since it is a natural source of protein, the macromolecules that some believe is better derived from animal flesh. Soy-based foods, and tofu products, are very popular with vegans and vegetarians and are a natural “meat replacer” in nearly ever meal.

“It’s as if these people prefer not to eat animals,” said Trevor Hambone, of the Farmers Against Soy and Kale (FASK). “I mean, animals are made for eating … not tofu. Don’t you think if tofu was meant to be eaten, it would be attached to bones and covered in fur or skin? I mean … I’ve never …”

Soybeans, or soy, have been gaining popularity in the United State and are used in tofu, soy milk and various dairy and meat substitutes. It is also used in fermented foods like miso, natto and tempeh, which are commonly consumed in some Asian countries and are offered at every Asian restaurant from New York to California. While soy is actually good for your health, over 90% of soy produced in the U.S. is genetically modified and the crops are sprayed with the herbicide Roundup, which may be associated with adverse effects on health. So, when selecting soy, be sure to look for “non-GMO” and “organic” certifications.

Soy, it turns out, is also good for your heart. One study suggests that eating foods that contain isoflavones (like soy products) every day may help lower blood pressure and it is thought that the isoflavones work by encouraging your body to produce nitric oxide, which helps to dilate blood vessels and reduce the pressure created by blood against the vessel walls. Additionally, whole soy foods contain high levels of healthy protein and fiber. Fiber helps to reduce bad cholesterol, plus, soy is a much better source of protein for your heart than saturated-fat-rich animal-derived foods.

However, to one Oklahoma company, any amount of evidence indicating the safety of soy doesn’t seem to matter. “I don’t care what the health experts say,” continued Drimple. “Soybeans killed Sheppy.”

Go vegan.

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