Edible Finger Lakes’ Not So Palatable Cover

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As you read this, keep one thing in mind: I’m an ethical vegan. Yes, my diet is vegan (no meat, dairy, eggs, or honey) but being an ethical vegan goes a few steps further. Not only have I replaced all my animal-sourced clothing and personal care products with cruelty-free versions, but I have “made the connection.” I not only recognize where meat comes from but I also have deep, emotional feelings attached to the animals that are purposefully (and needlessly) bred and raised to be raped, tortured, and killed for food.

So, as you read this blog post, please keep this in mind.

I was at the grocery store this week when something caught my eye. In fact, I had this feeling I was being watched. There on the shelf, among other travel and food magazines, was the new issue of Edible Finger Lakes, the regional culinary and travel publication for the areaย where I live in New York State. Staring at me, with an undeniable sadness in its eyes was a sweet piglet. Captured at a moment in time that now acts as a memorial to its life. This young piglet (former front cover magazine model) is now, surely, dead.

For no good reason. None.

To make matters worse, this piglet stood under the magazine’s masthead: “Edible Finger Lakes.” As if its only food and not a sentient being. As if it’s not an animal with a mother and a family and friends and a spirit attached to a will to live.

And this young piglet, withย the unforgettable look in its eyes, stood alongside the words “Good Meat,” presumably a lead-in to an article about how wonderfully these animals are raised, and fed, and treated so that the consumer (animal eaters) are guaranteed the highest quality pork anywhere. And of course, like all good meat, I’m sure this piglet was humanely killed. Humanely killed good meat.

Good meat?

Is that all it is? We won’t know its name? Or where it lived? Or anything else about its short life. Just the fact that it’s existence is considered good meat?

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What struck me the most, though, as I was leaving the store was that this innocent and trusting beast was most likely killed by the time I saw the magazine in the rack. Throat slit, skinned, bled, butchered, packaged and sold. Its life never mattered to anyone who crossed its path. Or looked it in the eyes. Or, took its photograph and decided to put it on the cover of a magazine.

When did humankind become so callous and uncaring and cold?

Is this really what we’ve become?

When did an intelligent and social animal, like a pig, become the “mascot” for bacon? Pigs aren’t made of bacon.

Hipsters, in your flannel shirts and thick-glasses and shaggy beards, please find another food to worship. Please. And Edible Finger Lakes, please try to be more compassionate in the future when choosing a front cover image.

Go vegan.

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@Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret to Screen in #Ithaca

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ย โ€œCOWSPIRACY: the Sustainability Secret,โ€ the documentary uncovering the immense environemental impact of large-scale factory farming, to Screen in Ithaca, NY in October …

Cornell University Vegan Society and ThankTank Creative Present

[ITHACA, NY] Cornell University Vegan Society and ThankTank Creative present a limited screening of the controversial documentary โ€œCOWSPIRACY: the Sustainability Secretโ€ on Thursday, October 23, 2014 at 7:30 PM at Regal Ithaca Mall Stadium 14. Reserved seating tickets are currently available and recommended.

โ€œCOWSPIRACY: the Sustainability Secretโ€ is a groundbreaking feature-length environmental documentary following an intrepid filmmaker as he uncovers the most destructive industry facing the planet today โ€“ and investigates why the world’s leading environmental organizations are too afraid to talk about it. As eye-opening as โ€œBlackfishโ€ and as inspiring as โ€œAn Inconvenient Truth,โ€ this shocking yet humorous documentary reveals the absolutely devastating environmental impact large-scale factory farming has on our planet.

โ€œThis is an important film for everyone to see,โ€ said Eric C Lindstrom, President of ThankTank Creative. โ€œEvery few years a documentary comes along that everyone who cares about this planet needs to see, this is one of those documentaries.โ€

โ€œCOWSPIRACY: the Sustainability Secretโ€ has been screening across the world since its release and this limited engagement screening at Regal Ithaca Mall Stadium 14 provides the Finger Lakes Region an opportunity to learn more about the environmental impact of large-scale factory farming around the world.

For more information visit and to reserve your seats,ย www.tugg.com.

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Burger King in Japan launches black cheeseburger, the world recoils in horror

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You have GOT to be kidding me …

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AD_145459940.jpg Why ruin a perfectly good yellow cheese? (Picture: Burger King)

First Chinese McDonaldโ€™s launched a rank looking set of black and white burger, and now Japanese Burger King are selling black cheeseburgers โ€“ as in black buns with a patty and melted black cheese.

Erm no, thatโ€™s not OK.

The popular fast food restaurant has been selling the Kuro Burger since 2012, but the cheese layer is a whole new ingredient being unleashed for 2014.

The black colouring comes from charcoal and is apparent in both the bun, and, as you can clearly see โ€“ the cheese.

Thereโ€™s also a squid ink, onion and garlic sauce to really top of the dark and pretty ghastly looking creation.

AD_145459919.jpg The one on the left looks like a goth, if a goth was a burger (Picture: Burger King)

The ugly burger launches nationwide in Japan on September 19 with two varieties โ€“ oneโ€ฆ

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Miyokos Kitchen Launches New Website (and ThankTank Creative was there …)!

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MiyokosKitchenFullSiteI first met Miyoko Schinner at the Vegetarian Summerfest two years ago. That was a huge turning point for me as a vegan. As with many before me, cheese (especially creamy, rich, artisan cheese) was something I was not looking forward to giving up. During this event, Miyoko conducted a demonstration and tasting of her amazing culinary skills and actually performed a miracle … she made vegan cheese right before myย eyes (in one instance, she made mozzarella … which, on its own is not an easy task). I was immediately in love.

So, years later when I started my vegan marketing and design firm, I knew I wanted to work with Miyoko as she launched her incredible collections of vegan cheeses (referred to as cultured nut products because of California state law) to the world.

Interesting to note, that mid-way through the design and programming of the site, Miyoko was invited to New York to speak at the Farm Sanctuary in Watkins Glen (about 40 minutes from where I live). Being the amazing woman that she is, she drove to have dinner with us in the pouring rain and got to be a part of one of our last-minute vegan potlucks. Needless to say, I became somewhat of a hero that day since she also traveled with three wheels of cheese. Plus, I got to introduce her to the Ithaca Vegan Mafia and take her on a post-rain walk around Cornell campus. It was a really nice evening.

So, today MiyokosKitchen.com finallyย launches. With the help of ThankTank Creative and a huge team effort, MiyokosKitchen.com is open for business. The new site (which is still in its “organic” stage) features collections of cheeses that will satisfy anyone … especially omnivores. What I am most excited about, beyond having had this opportunity to be a part of history, is that Miyoko’s cheeses are so good … SO good … that they will help so many thousands of people take that next step toward veganism.

And that makes the world a better place.

Follow Miyoko’s Kitchen on Twitter and Facebook and go buy some cheese!

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